Amazing Math: Introduction to Platonic Solids by Sunil Tanna

By Sunil Tanna

This booklet is a advisor to the five Platonic solids (regular tetrahedron, dice, standard octahedron, average dodecahedron, and ordinary icosahedron). those solids are vital in arithmetic, in nature, and are the single five convex ordinary polyhedra that exist.

subject matters coated contain:

  • What the Platonic solids are
  • The historical past of the invention of Platonic solids
  • The universal positive aspects of all Platonic solids
  • The geometrical info of every Platonic sturdy
  • Examples of the place each one form of Platonic reliable happens in nature
  • How we all know there are just 5 sorts of Platonic strong (geometric evidence)
  • A topological evidence that there are just 5 forms of Platonic strong
  • What are twin polyhedrons
  • What is the twin polyhedron for every of the Platonic solids
  • The relationships among each one Platonic good and its twin polyhedron
  • How to calculate angles in Platonic solids utilizing trigonometric formulae
  • The courting among spheres and Platonic solids
  • How to calculate the outside region of a Platonic stable
  • How to calculate the quantity of a Platonic stable

additionally integrated is a quick creation to a couple different attention-grabbing kinds of polyhedra – prisms, antiprisms, Kepler-Poinsot polyhedra, Archimedean solids, Catalan solids, Johnson solids, and deltahedra.

a few familiarity with uncomplicated trigonometry and intensely simple algebra (high university point) will let you get the main out of this ebook - yet that allows you to make this booklet obtainable to as many of us as attainable, it does contain a quick recap on a few invaluable easy thoughts from trigonometry.

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Additional info for Amazing Math: Introduction to Platonic Solids

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I hope you enjoy this book, which is one of several books that I have written. com/science Introducing Platonic Solids Platonic solids are 3-dimensional shapes whose faces are all the same size and shape. There are 5 Platonic solids: Regular tetrahedron (also known as "triangular pyramid") - A shape with 4 faces, each face being a triangle Regular octahedron (also known as "square bipyramid") – A shape with 8 faces, each face being a triangle Regular icosahedron – A shape with 20 faces, each face being a triangle Regular hexahedron (also known as "cube") – A shape with 6 faces, each face being a square Regular dodecahedron – A shape with 12 faces, each face being a pentagon In the next chapter, we will develop a more rigorous mathematical definition of Platonic solids, and see what links these particular 5 shapes – and no others.

Finally, a convex polyhedron is one in which any two points inside the shape can be joined by a straight line segment that itself does not go outside the shape. So, for example: A cube would be convex, because any two points inside the cube can be linked by a straight line which does not emerge from the cube. A square pyramid would be convex,, because any two points inside the pyramid can be linked by a straight line which does not emerge from the pyramid. A triangular prism would be convex,, because any two points inside the prism can be linked by a straight line which does not emerge from the prism.

It can be calculated using this formula: The dihedral angle can also be calculated using this formula: where h (known as the Coxeter number) is 4 for a tetrahedron, 6 for a hexahedron or octahedron, and 10 for a tetrahedron or icosahedron. The angular deficiency, usually denoted by the symbol δ, is the difference between the sum of the face angles and 2π. However there is also a simpler formula for δ. French mathematician and philosopher René Descartes (March 31st, 1596 to February 11th, 1650) showed that the total angular deficiency will always be 4π, hence: where V is the total number of vertices in the Platonic solid.

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